Past, Present & Future

Past

Spreading Ink

I seem to have sadly neglected this blog for the last month or two. Personal projects and my day job took the driver’s seat in my design life, but I’m ready to start posting again!

Lately I have been working a lot on letterpress projects. Here are some photos of some typesetting on press! If you live in NYC and would like to try your hand at some letterpress work, check out The Arm in Brooklyn!

I am convinced that there is nothing in the world that compares to pulling a fresh print off a press.

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Lubalin Graph

[Brooklyn Flea—Fort Greene, Brooklyn]


Virtual Travel: Dumont Texas Highway

[via Google Maps]


Virtual Travel: Detroit, Michigan, USA

While not all of Detroit is characterized by urban decay, it has always been an attribute that I visually enjoy. [via Google Maps]


116 Years

The Times has created an impressive infographic visualizing the modern Olympic results, in three events, during the 116 year history of the modern games. Visualized are the long jump, the 100m swimming freestyle, and the 100m dash. Each chart shows where past Olympians would stand at the time of the top competitors finish.

It is fascinating to see how much better, faster, and more determined we have become. Some of these accelerated results may stem from pure human achievement, and some may stem from advances in technology and evolution of the game in question, but whatever the reason these graphs are a reminder of the greatness we can achieve. All in all, it is a wonderful visualization.
[via The New York Times]


For Sale

[Howell, New Jersey]


Virtual Travel: The Heidelberg Project – Detroit, Michigan

The Heidelberg Project is a unique art environment located in the heart of Detroit’s East Side. The project’s main focus is to take a stand to save forgotten neighborhoods and to heal communities through art. Founder and artistic director Tyree Guyton uses everyday, discarded objects to transform a once closely abandoned area into an area full of color, symbolism, and creativity. The project has been around for about 26 years and  is recognized around the world as a demonstration of the power of creativity to transform lives.

When I stumbled over the project on Google Maps while perusing through Detroit I couldn’t help but smile at the colorful houses and art displays juxtaposed against the normal images of urban decay. If you would like to peruse the project on your own, check out the Heidelberg Project Google Street view!

[via Google Maps]


Depleted

2006 – [Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn, New York]


That’s the Spirit!

[Blue Ridge Flea Market—Saylorsburg, PA]


Virtual Travel: Es Mercadal, Balearic Islands, Spain

[via Google Maps]